Don’t Be Dangerously Distracted and Diverted, Part 2

By Brittany | May 31, 2012 | Category: Lifestyle and Health
Don’t Be Dangerously Distracted and Diverted, Part 2
By Patricia J. Sulak, MD
Dudley P. Baker Endowed Professor, Research and Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Medical Director, Division of Research Department, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Scott & White Clinic/Memorial Hospital, Temple, TX

In my last blog post on this topic, I ended the post by saying that people who successfully avoid being “diverted and distracted” have definition and discipline. So, what does that mean?

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Don’t Be Dangerously Distracted and Diverted, Part 1

By Brittany | May 29, 2012 | Category: Lifestyle and Health
Don’t Be Dangerously Distracted and Diverted, Part 1
By Patricia J. Sulak, MD
Dudley P. Baker Endowed Professor, Research and Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Medical Director, Division of Research Department, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Scott & White Clinic/Memorial Hospital, Temple, TX

In my past Lifestyle & Health columns, I’ve discussed Make Movement Mandatory, Critique Caloric Consumption, and Stifle Stress and Sever Suffering. But, how can we and our patients incorporate these habits into our lives that can foster health and happiness? I think it’s important that we “Don’t Be Dangerously Distracted and Diverted.” To quote Dr Jeff Clark, a friend and Scott & White neurologist, "It's a culture war!" Today, we are constantly being bombarded with images of lifestyles and products that are anything but a set-up for long-term health and happiness. We literally have to question everything

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Biosimilars: Much Ado About Nothing, Part 2

By Brittany | March 30, 2012 | Category: Pharmacotherapy
Biosimilars: Much Ado About Nothing, Part 2
By Ralph Tarantino, PhD
Pharmaceutical Consultant and Principal, SteriTech Solutions, LLC
Middletown, NJ

Let’s not forget the reason for the FDA’s existence. The agency was formed to assure the purity of food and drug products (1906). They went on to regulate drug safety (1937) and then drug efficacy (1962). The efficacy regulations were in response to what was truly a safety issue—the use of thalidomide in pregnant women. The FDA is the institutionalized embodiment of the Hippocratic Oath to “first do no harm.” They are cautious because that is their job. Safety does come first. You can always replace a drug that’s not working, but you cannot replace a patient who has died. Suggesting biosimilars could be approved without clinical data is not a very cautious position to take and leads one to wonder about the possible motivation of the FDA in taking that position.

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Biosimilars: Much Ado About Nothing, Part 1

By Brittany | March 23, 2012 | Category: Pharmacotherapy
Biosimilars: Much Ado About Nothing, Part 1
By Ralph Tarantino, PhD
Pharmaceutical Consultant and Principal, SteriTech Solutions, LLC
Middletown, NJ

The eagerly awaited draft guidance on biosimilars* was finally issued by the FDA on February 9, 2012. It was drafted in the spirit of enlightened health care reform, with a view towards fiscal responsibility and. . . to annoy the nemesis of all that is good in health care, “Greedy Big Pharma.”

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Are Your Vitamin Supplements Curing You or Killing You?

Are Your Vitamin Supplements Curing You or Killing You?
By Patricia J. Sulak, MD
Dudley P. Baker Endowed Professor, Research and Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Medical Director, Division of Research Department, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Scott & White Clinic/Memorial Hospital, Temple, TX

Are any readers of this blog NOT on a vitamin, mineral, or other type of supplement such as glucosamine/chondroitin or omega fatty acids? Among the elderly, use of supplements has increased dramatically over the past two decades. An estimated $20 billion is spent annually on these products. While originally thought to be helpful and not harmful, high doses of certain dietary supplements have been shown to have no benefit and sometimes increase health risks.

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Patients Need Physicians, Not Technocrats: Part 2

By Brittany | March 09, 2012 | Category: Practice management in ObGyn
Patients Need Physicians, Not Technocrats: Part 2
By Mary Jane Minkin, MD
Clinical Professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine; and Obstetrics, Gynecology and Menopause Physician, PC, New Haven, CT.

I have never minded spending any amount of time when a patient needed me or to do anything that bettered patient care. I am sure that none of you have ever minded being awakened at night by a patient who was ill and needed attention: hey, we’re ObGyns. I would not object to spending any amount of time on the conversion to an electronic medical records (EMR) system if I thought it would really benefit patient care. But I am convinced that it does not.

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Patients Need Physicians, Not Technocrats: Part 1

By Brittany | March 01, 2012 | Category: Practice management in ObGyn
Patients Need Physicians, Not Technocrats: Part 1
By Mary Jane Minkin, MD
Clinical Professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine; and Obstetrics, Gynecology and Menopause Physician, PC, New Haven, CT.

I knew that I would have problems with our new electronic medical record (EMR) system on the first day of training. The initial training was conducted by a programmatic, not medically trained “yuppette” from the IT Department, who extolled to a 60-year-old Mac user the wonders of the EMR system: you should right click here, single click there (oops, don’t double click!), and then enter some esoteric bit of medical history.

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Substitution of Doxil in Ovarian Cancer? There Must Be a Better Way

By Brittany | February 28, 2012 | Category: Cancer, Ovarian cancer, Pharmacotherapy
Substitution of Doxil in Ovarian Cancer? There Must Be a Better Way
By Ralph Tarantino, PhD
Pharmaceutical Consultant and Principal, SteriTech Solutions, LLC
Middletown, NJ

The FDA’s most recent response to the anti-cancer drug shortage crisis may be a perfect example of “too little, too late.” What follows will not be a rant about offshore outsourcing or the regulatory climate in general. However, the FDA decision (See FDA’s Press Release regarding shortages of anti-cancer drugs here) to allow Sun Pharma’s version of Doxil (doxorubicin HCl liposome injection) into the United States to replace the approved Ben Venue product may be a dangerous one for patients with ovarian cancer.

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A Woman’s Sexual Health: Ready for Prime Time?

By Brittany | February 21, 2012 | Category: Sexuality
A Woman’s Sexual Health: Ready for Prime Time?

 

By Michael L. Krychman, MDCM
Medical Director The Sexual Medicine Center, Executive Director Southern California Center of Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine Newport Beach, CA, Faculty Member University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA.

As a health care professional I see that many women are now becoming more active in their own sexual satisfaction and discussing issues of sexual health concerns; however, it is remarkably amazing how different the media sees the difference between male and female sexuality. It is not uncommon to pick up a lay magazine or watch a prime time television show and see an advertisement for a male erectile medication. The media has essentially embraced male erectile dysfunction and even use the word erection. But when was the last time we saw an ad about vaginal dryness or female sexual pain or a woman’s loss of sexual interest?

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"Take Two Prozac and Call Me in the Morning"

By Brittany | February 10, 2012 | Category: Depression, Mood disorders, Pharmacotherapy
"Take Two Prozac and Call Me in the Morning"
By Ralph Tarantino, PhD
Pharmaceutical Consultant and Principal, SteriTech Solutions, LLC
Middletown, NJ
 

A recent analysis of the CDC’s National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (Health Aff. 2011;30:1434) showed that 4 out of 5 prescribers of antidepressants are not psychiatrists. Alarmed? You should be.

White, female patients over the age of 50 with some form of health coverage are the usual recipients of this treatment. Frequently, they have other chronic illnesses, and for many no true diagnosis of depression exists. As a culture we have been bombarded with the warning that “depression is a serious medical condition”; it’s a warning that should be heeded. The costs of depression with regard to human life, the health care system, and the economy in general are enormous.

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